Aspirin Sensitivity, The Basic Truth

Contrary to what your folks usually think, and from what you may have heard while growing up, aspirin sensitivity is not an allergy. Though, the effects and symptoms of the case can be somehow depicting and similar to those of allergies, aspirin sensitivity is not and will never be a true allergy.

Though, aspirin sensitivity may result in adverse and similar to allergy type of reactions in affected persons.

Usually, reported cases of aspirin sensitivity are linked to those who contract moderate to almost severe form of asthma and also to chronic sinusitis.

Severity of asthma raises the susceptibility of one person to the disease. Advancing age or simply put, aging, also is a great factor that leads to aspirin sensitivity.

Take note that according to a modern study in the medicine discipline, nine out of ten, or 90%, of people who are diagnosed or described as aspirin sensitive are at the same time sensitive or manifest adverse reaction to allergy-causing drugs, foods and inhalants.

A brief history of aspirin sensitivity

Aspirin is one of the most common over-the-counter drug that is taken by people with mild fever, body aches and other mild ailments. Nowadays, aspirin tablets are also taken as a preventive drug against heart attacks or strokes.

But did you know that aspirin simultaneously originated from Egypt, Assyria and Greece. In those ancient civilizations, aspirin was in the form of a white willow bark that was then used to treat fever and pain.

The ancient Greeks, Assyrians and Egyptians also used that white willow bark, now identified as aspirin, to treat sore muscles, chills, rheumatism and headaches. The native American tribes also had the knowledge of such practices.

In 1828, salicin which was an active and stand out ingredient or chemical from the willow bark was isolated. Ten years after, in 1838, salicylic acid was first produced from hydrolysis and oxidation of salicin. In 1893, the first modern form of aspirin was produced.

The drug company Bayer secured the rights to the aspirin official trade mark and name on March 6, 1899. The rest, as they say, is a common and prolonged history.

Symptoms and Treatment

Because aspirin is so widely used today, it is somehow surprising that the drug produces sensitivity to certain people. Aspirin sensitivity almost always show up or manifest as rhinitis or what we call nasal congestion.

Aspirin sensitivity can also be mistaken for asthma or hives because the symptoms and signs of ailment are almost the same.

Through several experiments, you can determine if you are sensitive to aspirin. Take the following steps. First, take a very small dose of aspirin. Be very particular, small dose, or you might end up somewhere very unlikely if ever you are sensitive to aspirin.

After taking the small dosage, observe yourself for any sign of cough or wheezing. There will come out itchy rashes around the mouth area and watery eyes and nasal congestion is evident.

In some rare conditions, aspirin sensitivity can also cause the development of anaphylaxis or breathing difficulty, which is an allergic reaction common to bee stings. There will also be severe decline in the patient’s blood pressure.

If you are diagnosed with aspirin sensitivity, desensitization can be done under intense and monitored medical supervision. This can be funny, but such desensitization will involve taking in very little dosages of aspirin everyday until the sensitivity is gone.

If an aspirin sensitivity attack is taking place, it is best to seek immediate medical help and attention. No drugs should be taken without the doctor’s prescription or administration, because adverse reaction to other drugs can lead to fatality.

To prevent aspirin sensitivity attacks, it is advise that you avoid taking in, of course, aspirin or other anti-inflammatory medicines or NSAIDs like naproxen and ibuprofen.